Israel's Good Name

Army Trip: Mount Carmel & Shefayim Waterpark

In Coastal Plain, Haifa, Israel on September 2, 2014 at 5:04 AM

Back in June, the day after Shavuot our entire battalion went on a little trip, visiting two places: Mount Carmel and the Shefayim waterpark. Loading up on buses in the morning, we drove up the mountain not far from the base and parked at the first site, the memorial for the Carmel Fire – the enormous forest fire in 2010 that claimed 44 lives.

Carmel Fire Memorial

Carmel Fire Memorial

The greatest Israeli natural disaster in modern times, the Carmel Fire spread at an alarming rate and as various security forces and firefighters converged on the site, one Prison Service bus got caught in the blaze and 37 cadets and commanders were tragically killed. The fire spread over the next few days and destroyed all in its path. More than 17,000 people were evacuated and nearly 10,000 acres of forest was burnt. The blaze even came close to my base, at the western foot of Mount Carmel. In this aerial photo I found on Wikipedia, my base is obscured by the fire’s smoke (also visible from space and additionally photographed by NASA):

The smoke from the fire in 2010

The smoke from the fire in 2010

We all gathered at the memorial and the battalion commanders spoke, outlining the plan of the day and informing us that several SPNI guides were to be taking the Mount Carmel hike with us (SPNI – Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel). After respecting the dead and photographing the memorial site, we head out on our mountainous hike – each company starting a few minutes after the previous one. Not much of a herd follower, I meandered around and took my time, the groups passing me by.

Misty mountain scenery

Misty mountain scenery

What I had imagined would be a simple, rather symbolic, hike was actually a legitimate mountain hike with craggy footholds and sheer cliff edges. One thing that I found interesting was the fact that many of the blackened trees stand exactly as they had several years back. We walked and walked, and then I came upon one of the SPNI guides giving some background on the region’s fauna. When that came to end, I hurried on ahead and climbed the trail’s rocky path, passing too many littered water bottles.

Up we go!

Up we go!

Eventually, with the howling masses at my heels, I finished the hike sweaty and invigorated. I enjoyed a quick snack and then ditched my M16 with the special vehicle and crew tasked with the job. Sitting beside a friend, we set off for our next destination, the Shefayim Waterpark. As this was my first waterpark, I was excited to have the new experience but rather apprehensive at having the experience with an entire battalion. Within an hour we pulled up at the waterpark, just north of Herzaliya, and we disembarked. Slipping into something a little more comfortable, we had lunch and then headed for the water. With so many choices, but so many lines, I first plunged into the main swimming pool. Then a different pool, and then an interesting tube ride. It was on that tube ride that we capsised at the end and lost track of our other friend.

Shefayim waterpark

Shefayim waterpark

Waterparks being waterparks, I don’t know what more to say – rumour is that the army is taking us to yet another waterpark, thanking us for our hard work during Operation Protective Edge.

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